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Caregiver‘s Gaze and Field of View Presumption Method During Bath Care in the Elderly Facility

  • Akiyoshi Yamamoto
  • Noriyuki Kida
  • Akihiko Goto
  • Tomoko Ota
  • Tatsunori Azuma
  • Syuji Yamamoto
  • Henry BarramedaJr
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8529)

Abstract

Reduced mental fatigue and ease of mind on caregivers are crucial in order to deliver safe bath care assistance in the elderly facility. In this paper, we present an experiment quantifying the eye gaze and field of view of the caregiver while performing bath care assistance. First, we used optical motion analyzing apparatus, head mounted gaze measuring apparatus, motion sensor (applied to 5 points: wrist, waist, neck, head and ankle in sequence) and compared data. Subjects imitated the motions of bathing assistance in a laboratory. Second, we clarified the validity of data by studying simultaneously recorded multiple people’s data taken under role play settings (caregiver role and care receiver role) in an actual bathroom setting. The findings of the study are highly relevant in outlining a safe and secure bathing assistance related to reducing the mental burden on caregivers as well as giving them “ease of mind” while performing bath care.

Keywords

caregiver elderly facility bath care assistance presumption method blind spot motion capture 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akiyoshi Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Noriyuki Kida
    • 2
  • Akihiko Goto
    • 3
  • Tomoko Ota
    • 4
  • Tatsunori Azuma
    • 1
  • Syuji Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Henry BarramedaJr
    • 1
  1. 1.Super Court Co., LtdOsakaJapan
  2. 2.Kyoto Institute of TechnologyKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Osaka Sangyo UniversityOsakaJapan
  4. 4.Chuo Business GroupOsakaJapan

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