Patterns of Water Law

Chapter
Part of the Springer Water book series (SPWA)

Abstract

Water law through the centuries has conformed to a limited set of patterns, in part because of the characteristics of the resource and in part because of the migration of water laws from society to society. In order to describe these patterns, this chapter summarily traces the evolution and characteristics of national, transnational (regional), and international water law, how they are related, and where they might be headed.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ArdmoreUSA

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