Cloud Storage Services in Higher Education – Results of a Preliminary Study in the Context of the Sync&Share-Project in Germany

  • Christian Meske
  • Stefan Stieglitz
  • Raimund Vogl
  • Dominik Rudolph
  • Ayten Öksüz
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8523)

Abstract

In recent years, a growing number of institutions in higher education is in progress to adopt cloud storage services. This paper describes the Sync&Share NRW-project in North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany) with a target audience of up to 500,000 users and presents the main results of a preliminary large-scale survey at the University of Muenster with more than 3,000 participants. The results of the analysis indicates a very high demand for an on-premise cloud service solution in German higher education with mobile access, a storage volume comparable to commercial offerings, collaborative features such as simultaneous work on text documents and, above all, high data protection standards.

Keywords

cloud storage services higher education technology adoption trust 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Meske
    • 1
  • Stefan Stieglitz
    • 1
  • Raimund Vogl
    • 2
  • Dominik Rudolph
    • 2
  • Ayten Öksüz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information SystemsUniversity of MuensterGermany
  2. 2.ZIV-Centre for Applied Information TechnologyUniversity of MuensterGermany

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