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The Uncharted Territory: Time Perspective Research Meets Clinical Practice. Temporal Focus in Psychotherapy Across Adulthood and Old Age

  • Elena Kazakina
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter demonstrates how maturing time perspective research can inform clinical practice and points to the role of Zimbardo in bringing TP studies in mainstream psychology. I describe the novel tasks of applying clinical discoveries into study of temporal phenomena and elaborate the notions of balanced temporality, optimal time perspective and time competence. Scientist-practitioners’ individual experience of time and personal biography are discussed as they shape their research and clinical interests. Multidimensional approach to study of TP applied in my own research (Kazakina, Time perspective of older adults: Relationships to attachment style, psychological well-being and psychological distress. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Columbia University, 1999; Kazakina, Time perspective of older adults: Research and clinical practice. In: International studies in time perspective, 2013) provided the foundation of my clinical work. I demonstrate how temporal focus of clinical strategies can be integrated with psychodynamic, cognitive- behavioral and existential approaches. Clinical cases point out the development of temporal interventions targeting symptoms of psychological distress and challenges of life transitions in adulthood and old age. Facilitation of optimal time perspective in the process of psychotherapy is associated with my patients positive functioning (self-actualization, interpersonal effectiveness, well-being). The further directions of TP research and psychotherapy are discussed.

Keywords

Time Orientation Attachment Style Time Perspective Temporal Integration Future Orientation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Independent Private PracticeEast BrunswickUSA

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