Augmented Reality Art pp 295-304

Part of the Springer Series on Cultural Computing book series (SSCC) | Cite as

Shifting Perceptions – Shifting Realities

Chapter

Abstract

A confrontation with augmented reality (AR) fuses a virtual entity in a geographical location and promotes psychological immersion and perceptual shifts. As the body’s physical relationship repositions itself to a restructured world, AR influences emotional thinking. This chapter is an artistic journey to define perceptual shifts, explore the multiplicity of realities and reveal the many layers of a sense of presence through Immersion. AR art incorporated in small southern Indiana town makes the locals wary of strangers waving computer devices to capture photographs of their sanctuary. The musings and conversations that transpire offer a window into a world beyond AR which opens up an awareness to the historicity of the moment. The AR appears as a balloon shaped heart blazing with a picture of Lenin raising his arm to the sky. The AR is motivated by Skwarek’s participation in the Occupy movement and the celebration of May Day and the motivations of these movements are also discussed. AR facilitates an investigation of space and an earnestness of place in the community.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.HR Hope School of Fine Arts, Pervasive Technology Institute, Institute of Digital Arts and HumanitiesIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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