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Narrative Serious Game Mechanics (NSGM) – Insights into the Narrative-Pedagogical Mechanism

  • Theodore Lim
  • Sandy Louchart
  • Neil Suttie
  • Jannicke Baalsrud Hauge
  • Ioana A. Stanescu
  • Ivan M. Ortiz
  • Pablo Moreno-Ger
  • Francesco Bellotti
  • Maira B. Carvalho
  • Jeffrey Earp
  • Michela Ott
  • Sylvester Arnab
  • Riccardo Berta
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8395)

Abstract

Narratives are used to construct and deconstruct the time and space of events. In games, as in real life, narratives add layers of meaning and engage players by enhancing or clarifying content. From an educational perspective, narratives are a semiotic conduit for evoking critical thinking skills and promoting knowledge discovery/acquisition. While narrative is central to Serious Games (SG), the relationships between gameplay, narrative and pedagogy in SG design remain unclear, and narrative’s elemental influence on learning outcomes is not fully understood yet. This paper presents a purpose-processing methodology that aims to support the mapping of SG design patterns and pedagogical practices, allowing designers to create more meaningful SGs. In the case of narrative, the intention is to establish whether Narrative Serious Game Mechanics (NSGM) can provide players with opportunities for reasoning and reflective analysis that may even transcend the game-based learning environment.

Keywords

Game Design Digital Game Cognitive Apprenticeship Game Mechanics Game Element 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore Lim
    • 1
  • Sandy Louchart
    • 1
  • Neil Suttie
    • 1
  • Jannicke Baalsrud Hauge
    • 2
  • Ioana A. Stanescu
    • 3
  • Ivan M. Ortiz
    • 4
  • Pablo Moreno-Ger
    • 4
  • Francesco Bellotti
    • 5
  • Maira B. Carvalho
    • 5
  • Jeffrey Earp
    • 6
  • Michela Ott
    • 6
  • Sylvester Arnab
    • 7
  • Riccardo Berta
    • 5
  1. 1.Heriot-Watt UniversityRiccartonScotland, UK
  2. 2.Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik (BIBA)Germany
  3. 3.National Defence University "Carol I"BucharestRomania
  4. 4.Complutense UniversityMadridSpain
  5. 5.University of GenoaGenovaItaly
  6. 6.Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)GenovaItaly
  7. 7.Serious Games InstituteCoventry UniversityCoventryUK

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