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Transforming Mathematics Instruction: What Do We Know and What Can We Learn from Multiple Approaches and Practices?

  • Yeping LiEmail author
  • Edward A. Silver
  • Shiqi Li
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Mathematics Education book series (AME)

Abstract

Mathematics classroom instruction, often seen as a key contributing factor to students’ learning, has remained virtually unchanged for the past several decades. Efforts to improve the quality of mathematics education have led to multiple approaches and research that target different contributing factors but lack a systematic account of diverse approaches and practices for improving mathematics instruction. This book is thus designed to survey, synthesize, and extend current research on specific approaches and practices that are developed and used in different education systems for transforming mathematics instruction. In this introduction chapter, we highlight the background of this book project, its purposes, and what can be learned from reading this book.

Keywords

Cultural context Curriculum changes Education system Instructional transformation International perspective Mathematics instruction Mathematics teacher education 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Teaching, Learning and CultureTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.School of EducationUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Department of MathematicsEast China Normal UniversityShanghaiChina

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