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Leveraging the Model-Driven Architecture for Service Choreography in Ubiquitous Systems

  • Carlos Rodríguez-Domínguez
  • Tomás Ruiz-López
  • José Luis Garrido
  • Manuel Noguera
  • Kawtar Benghazi
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8276)

Abstract

In ubiquitous systems, the context information (location, time, networking conditions, etc.) may influence the way of operation or even require to guarantee the availability of particular services at a certain moment. As a consequence, service composition may become more complex from a design viewpoint, due to the need of systematically taking into account all the variations of the contextual information in order to adapt the behavior of the set of involved services. Business Process Model and Notation 2.0 (BPMN 2.0) can be used to specify process choreography, which helps modeling service composition. Even so, the peculiarities of ubiquitous systems make it difficult to actually obtain an executable model that fulfills the mobility, availability and adaptability requirements of these systems. In this paper, it is presented a Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) approach to transform a BPMN choreography model into software templates for specific target platforms. The proposal has been implemented making use of the Eclipse Modeling Framework (EMF).

Keywords

Ubiquitous systems model-driven architecture service choreography software engineering 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlos Rodríguez-Domínguez
    • 1
  • Tomás Ruiz-López
    • 1
  • José Luis Garrido
    • 1
  • Manuel Noguera
    • 1
  • Kawtar Benghazi
    • 1
  1. 1.Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenierías Informática y TelecomunicaciónUniversity of GranadaGranadaSpain

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