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Toinggg: How Changes in Children’s Activity Level Influence Creativity in Open-Ended Play

  • Bas van Hoeve
  • Linda de Valk
  • Tilde Bekker
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8253)

Abstract

This paper describes an explorative study with an open-ended play environment called Toinggg that consists of three interactive trampolines and was developed for children aged 6-8 years old. Toinggg was used to evaluate the change of children’s activity level on creativity in open-ended play. With this exploration, we aim to gain a better understanding of the balance between physical activity and creativity in play. In a user evaluation twenty-one children played in groups of three with Toinggg. Results show an increase in development of new game play and creativity after a moment of rest concerning the activity level of the interaction behavior.

Keywords

Open-ended Play Physical Play Creativity Design Research 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bas van Hoeve
    • 1
  • Linda de Valk
    • 1
  • Tilde Bekker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Industrial DesignEindhoven University of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands

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