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Creating Immersive Audio and Lighting Based Physical Exercise Games for Schoolchildren

  • Jaakko Hakulinen
  • Markku Turunen
  • Tomi Heimonen
  • Tuuli Keskinen
  • Antti Sand
  • Janne Paavilainen
  • Jaana Parviainen
  • Sari Yrjänäinen
  • Frans Mäyrä
  • Jussi Okkonen
  • Roope Raisamo
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8253)

Abstract

We have created story-based exercise games utilizing light and sound to encourage children to participate in physical exercise in schools. Our reasonably priced technological setup provides practical and expressive means for creating immersive and rich experiences to support physical exercise education in schools. Studies conducted in schools showed that the story and drama elements draw children into the world of the exercise game. Moreover, children who do not like traditional games and exercises engaged in these activities. Our experiences also suggest that children’s imagination plays a great role in the design and engagement into exercise games, which makes co-creation with children a viable and exciting approach to creating new games.

Keywords

Exergaming interactive lighting storytelling 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaakko Hakulinen
    • 1
  • Markku Turunen
    • 1
  • Tomi Heimonen
    • 1
  • Tuuli Keskinen
    • 1
  • Antti Sand
    • 1
  • Janne Paavilainen
    • 1
  • Jaana Parviainen
    • 2
  • Sari Yrjänäinen
    • 3
  • Frans Mäyrä
    • 1
  • Jussi Okkonen
    • 1
  • Roope Raisamo
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Information SciencesUniversity of TampereFinland
  2. 2.School of Social Sciences and HumanitiesUniversity of TampereFinland
  3. 3.School of EducationUniversity of TampereFinland

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