Constructing and Connecting Storylines to Tell Museum Stories

  • Paul Mulholland
  • Annika Wolff
  • Zdenek Zdrahal
  • Ning Li
  • Joseph Corneli
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8230)

Abstract

Over the past decade a number of systems have been developed that tell museum stories by constructing digital presentations from cultural objects and their metadata. Our novel approach, informed by museum practice, is built around a formalization of stages of museum storytelling that involve: (i) the collection of events, museum objects and their associated stories, (ii) the construction of story sections that organise the content in different ways, and (iii) the assembly of story sections into a story structure. Here we focus in particular on this final stage of building the story structure. Our approach to providing intelligent assistance to story construction involves: (i) separating overlapping or conflicting story sections into separate candidate storylines, (ii) evaluating candidate storylines according the criteria of coverage, richness and coherence, (iii) assembling storylines into linear, layered or multi-route structures and (iv) ordering the story sections according to their setting within the storyline.

Keywords

Museum storytelling storylines ATMS clustering 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Mulholland
    • 1
  • Annika Wolff
    • 1
  • Zdenek Zdrahal
    • 1
  • Ning Li
    • 1
  • Joseph Corneli
    • 1
  1. 1.Knowledge Media InstituteThe Open UniversityMilton KeynesUK

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