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Literature as Societal Therapy: Appresentation, Epoché, and Beloved

  • Michael BarberEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Phenomenology book series (CTPH, volume 69)

Abstract

Enriching Wolfgang Iser’s theory of aesthetic response with Alfred Schutz’s idea that one undergoes a certain epoché in entering the sphere of literary reality, this paper shows how the reality of the novel involves different levels of appresentation with regard to levels of transcendencies, such as the spatio-temporally distant event or place, the experience of others (characters), or a reality transcending the reality of the novel, which the novel itself appresents. These levels of transcendencies invite the reader to press forward in reading the novel. The other reality the novel appresents, for instance, the unspeakable but often forgotten or repressed cruelty of the world of slavery appresented in Toni Morrison’s novel Beloved, can play a role in effecting societal therapy.

Keywords

Everyday Life Aesthetic Response Aesthetic Object Passive Synthesis Existential Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.St. Louis UniversitySt. LouisUSA

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