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Freedom 7 pp 29-64 | Cite as

The Mercury flight of chimpanzee Ham

  • Colin Burgess
Chapter
Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

By 31 January 1961, the United States was a nation undergoing radical cultural and ethical upheaval. Changes were swirling in the wind. On that day James Meredith, an African-American, applied for admission to the all-white University of Mississippi, known as “Ole Miss,” and so began a hard-fought legal action that would end in the desegregation of the university and the post-graduation shooting and wounding of Meredith by a white supremacist. That same day, a federal district court ordered the admission of two black students into Georgia University, and the State of Georgia repealed its long-standing laws which segregated the races in its public schools. The university was subsequently desegregated.

Keywords

Liquid Oxygen Launch Site Manned Flight White Supremacist Psychomotor Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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    Telephone interview conducted by Colin Burgess with Edward C. Dittmer, 21 June 2005Google Scholar
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    The Airman: The Official Magazine of the U.S. Air Force, published by Defense Media Activity, USAF Office of Public Affairs, Washington, DC, issue April 1962Google Scholar
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    Burgess, Colin and Chris Dubbs, Animals in Space: From Research Rockets to the Space Shuttle, Springer-Praxis Publishing Ltd., Chichester, UK, 2007Google Scholar
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    Telephone interview conducted by Colin Burgess with Edward C. Dittmer, 21 June 2005Google Scholar
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    White, Stanley C., M.D., Richard S. Johnston and Gerard J. Pesman, Review of Biomedical Systems for MR-3 Flight, extract from Proceedings of a Conference on Results of the First U.S. Manned Suborbital Space Flight, combined NASA/National Institutes of Health/National Academy of Sciences report, Washington, D.C., 6 June 1961Google Scholar
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    Lodi News-Sentinel (California) newspaper article, “Chimpanzee May Go Into Orbit,” Tuesday, 28 January 1961, pg. 9Google Scholar
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    Telephone interview conducted by Colin Burgess with Edward C. Dittmer, 21 June 2005Google Scholar
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    The Dispatch (Lexington, NC) newspaper article “Chimp Given Rocket Ride Over Atlantic,” issue Tuesday, 31 January 1961, pg. 1Google Scholar
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    The Norwalk Hour (Connecticut) newspaper, article “Famous Space Chimpanzee Plays Ham After Thrilling Rescue, issue Friday, 3 February 1961, pg. 4Google Scholar
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    Burgess, Colin and Chris Dubbs, Animals in Space: From Research Rockets to the Space Shuttle, Springer-Praxis Publishing Ltd., Chichester, UK, 2007Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin Burgess
    • 1
  1. 1.Bonnet BayAustralia

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