Advertisement

Phase-Shift Between Surface Ocean Warming, Evaporation and Changes of Continental Ice Volume During Termination I Observed at Tropical Ocean Sediment Cores

  • Anton EisenhauerEmail author
  • Christian Horn
  • Dirk Nürnberg
  • Thomas Blanz
  • Dieter Garbe-Schönberg
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Earth System Sciences book series (BRIEFSEARTHSYST)

Abstract

The hypothesis that the tropical oceans lead the global warming at the Termination I and II by ~2,000 to ~3,000 years (Visser et al. 2003) whereas melting of the northern continental ice masses is lacking behind challenges the Milankovitch theory of climate change and emphasizes the role of the tropics for global climate change. Although the simultaneous multi-proxy approach of planktonic foraminiferal Mg/Ca, δ18O and δ44/40Ca from tropical sediment core SO-164-03-4 (16° 32.37′ N; 72° 12.31′ W; 2,744 m) from the Caribbean tend to confirm the observation by Visser et al. (2003) we interpret the shift between Mg/Ca and δ18O in core SO-164-03-4 to be due to local changes in sea-surface salinity (SSS) variations triggered by glacial/interglacial related shifts of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ).

Keywords

Sea-surface temperature Sea-surface salinity Termination I ITCZ Foraminiferal geochemistry Ca isotopes 

References

  1. Eisenhauer A, Nägler TF, Stille P, Kramers J, Gussone N, Bock B, Fietzke J, Hippler D, Schmitt AD (2004) Proposal for international agreement on ca notation resulting from discussion at workshops on stable isotope measurement held in Davos (Goldschmidt 2002) and Nice (EGS-AGU-EUG 2003). Geostand Geoanal Res 28(1):149–151CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Gussone N, Eisenhauer A, Tiedemann R, Haug GH, Heuser A, Bock B, Nägler TF, Müller A (2004) Reconstruction of Caribbean Sea surface temperature and salinity fluctuations in response to the Pliocene closure of the Central American gateway and radiative forcing, using δ44/40Ca, δ18O and Mg/Ca ratios. Earth Planet Sci Lett 227(3–4):201–214. doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2004.09.004 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hippler D, Eisenhauer A, Nägler TF (2006) Tropical atlantic SST history inferred from Ca isotope thermometry over the last 140 ka. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 70:90–100CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Heuser A, Eisenhauer A, Gussone N, Bock B, Hansen BT, Nägler TF (2002) Measurement of calcium isotopes (δ44Ca) using a multicollector TIMS technique. J Mass Spectrom 220:385–397CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Kısakürek B, Eisenhauer A, Böhm F, Garbe-Schönberg D, Erez J (2008) Controls on shell Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in cultured planktonic foraminiferan, Globigerinoides ruber (white). Earth Planet Sci Lett 273:260–269CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Nürnberg D, Bijma J, Hemleben C (1996) Erratum assessing the reliability of magnesium in foraminiferal calcite as a proxy for water mass temperatures. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 60(13):2483–2484CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Nürnberg D (2000) Taking the temperature of past ocean surfaces. Science 289:1698–1699CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Regenberg M, Steph S, Nürnberg D, Tiedemann R, Garbe-Schönber D (2009) Calibrating Mg/Ca ratios of multiple planktonic foraminiferal species with δ18O-calcification temperatures: paleothermometry for the upper water column. Earth Planet Sci Lett 278:324–336CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Visser K, Thunell R, Stott L (2003) Magnitude and timing of temperature change in the Indo-pacific warm pool during deglaciation. Nat 421:152–155CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anton Eisenhauer
    • 1
    Email author
  • Christian Horn
    • 1
  • Dirk Nürnberg
    • 1
  • Thomas Blanz
    • 2
  • Dieter Garbe-Schönberg
    • 2
  1. 1.GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research KielKielGermany
  2. 2.Department of Geosciences, Institute of GeosciencesUniversity of KielKielGermany

Personalised recommendations