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Experimental Tests of Quantum Mechanics: Pauli Exclusion Principle and Spontaneous Collapse Models

  • Catalina Curceanu Petrascu
  • Sergio Bartalucci
  • Mario Bragadireanu
  • Alberto Clozza
  • Carlo Guaraldo
  • Mihai Iliescu
  • Alessandro Rizzo
  • Antonio Romero Vidal
  • Alessandro Scordo
  • Diana Laura Sirghi
  • Florin Sirghi
  • Laura Sperandio
  • Oton Vazquez Doce
  • Angelo Bassi
  • Sandro Donadi
  • Edoardo Milotti
  • Matthias Laubenstein
  • Sergio Bertolucci
  • Mario Bragadireanu
  • Catalina Curceanu
  • Dorel Pietreanu
  • Titus Ponta
  • Michael Cargnelli
  • Tomoichi Ishiwatari
  • Johann Marton
  • Eberhard Widmann
  • Johann Zmeskal
  • Sergio di Matteo
  • Jean Pierre Egger
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 145)

Abstract

The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP), as a consequence or the spin-statistics connection, is one of the basic principles of the modern physics. Being at the very basis of our understanding of matter, it spurs a lively debate on its possible limits, deeply rooted as it is in the very foundations of Quantum Field Theory. The VIP (VIolation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment is searching for a possible small violation of the PEP for electrons, using the method of searching for Pauli Exclusion Principle forbidden atomic transitions in copper. We describe the experimental method and the obtained results; we briefly present future plans to go beyond the actual limit by upgrading the experiment using vetoed new spectroscopic fast Silicon Drift Detectors. We also mention the possibility of using a similar experimental technique to search for possible X-rays generated in the spontaneous collapse models of quantum mechanics.

Keywords

Pauli Exclusion Principle Silicon Drift Detector Good Energy Resolution Collapse Model Small Violation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The VIP Collaboration wishes to thank all the LNGS laboratory staff for the precious help and assistance during all phases of preparation, installation and data taking. The support from the HadronPhysics2 FP7 (227431), from the MIUR PRIN2008 2008LH2X28_004 and from COST1006, Fundamental Problems in Quantum Physics projects is acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catalina Curceanu Petrascu
    • 1
  • Sergio Bartalucci
    • 1
  • Mario Bragadireanu
    • 1
  • Alberto Clozza
    • 1
  • Carlo Guaraldo
    • 1
  • Mihai Iliescu
    • 1
  • Alessandro Rizzo
    • 1
  • Antonio Romero Vidal
    • 1
  • Alessandro Scordo
    • 1
  • Diana Laura Sirghi
    • 1
    • 5
  • Florin Sirghi
    • 1
    • 5
  • Laura Sperandio
    • 1
  • Oton Vazquez Doce
    • 1
  • Angelo Bassi
    • 2
  • Sandro Donadi
    • 2
  • Edoardo Milotti
    • 2
  • Matthias Laubenstein
    • 3
  • Sergio Bertolucci
    • 4
  • Mario Bragadireanu
    • 5
  • Catalina Curceanu
    • 5
  • Dorel Pietreanu
    • 5
  • Titus Ponta
    • 5
  • Michael Cargnelli
    • 6
  • Tomoichi Ishiwatari
    • 6
  • Johann Marton
    • 6
  • Eberhard Widmann
    • 6
  • Johann Zmeskal
    • 6
  • Sergio di Matteo
    • 7
  • Jean Pierre Egger
    • 8
  1. 1.INFNLaboratori Nazionali di FrascatiFrascatiItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di FisicaUniversita’ di Trieste and INFN—Sezione di TriesteTriesteItaly
  3. 3.INFNLaboratori Nazionali di Gran SassoAssergiItaly
  4. 4.CERNGeneva 23Switzerland
  5. 5.“Horia Hulubei” National Institute of Physics and Nuclear EngineeringMagurele-BucharestRomania
  6. 6.The Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic PhysicsViennaAustria
  7. 7.Institut de Physique UMR CNRS-UR1 6251Universite’ de Rennes1RennesFrance
  8. 8.Institut de PhysiqueUniversite’ de NeuchatelNeuchatelSwitzerland

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