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Behavioral Risk Factors in Adults

  • Amelie G. Ramirez
  • Ian M. Thompson
  • Leonel Vela
Chapter

Abstract

Behavioral risk factors are behaviors that increase the possibility of disease, such as smoking, alcohol use, bad eating habits, and not getting enough exercise. Because they are behaviors, it is possible for individuals to modify these risk factors to help prevent many types of chronic diseases and premature death.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2013

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amelie G. Ramirez
    • 1
  • Ian M. Thompson
    • 2
  • Leonel Vela
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Health Promotion ResearchUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.Department of UrologyUT Health Science Center at San Antonio Cancer Therapy and Research CenterSan AntonioUSA
  3. 3.Regional Academic Health CenterUT Health Science Center at San AntonioHarlingenUSA

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