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Communicable Diseases

  • Amelie G. Ramirez
  • Ian M. Thompson
  • Leonel Vela
Chapter

Abstract

A communicable disease is one that can be transmitted or spread from one person or species to another, through either direct or indirect contact [1]. A multitude of different communicable diseases are currently reportable in Texas including tuberculosis and many types of sexually transmitted diseases. Incidence rates for communicable diseases in this chapter are presented as crude rates, without age-adjustment.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2013

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amelie G. Ramirez
    • 1
  • Ian M. Thompson
    • 2
  • Leonel Vela
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Health Promotion ResearchUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.Department of UrologyUT Health Science Center at San Antonio Cancer Therapy and Research CenterSan AntonioUSA
  3. 3.Regional Academic Health CenterUT Health Science Center at San AntonioHarlingenUSA

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