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Injury

  • Amelie G. Ramirez
  • Ian M. Thompson
  • Leonel Vela
Chapter

Abstract

Injury is a significant public health problem in the USA, causing disability and premature death regardless of race, sex, or economic status and creating a tremendous burden on our national health care system [1]. Injury is the leading cause of both disability and death in American children and young adults and is the fifth-leading cause of death overall in the USA [1, 2]. An estimated 182,479 individuals in the USA died from injuries in 2007 [1]. In 2007, more than 29 million people were treated for injuries in hospital emergency departments in America, and 2.8 million of these injuries were so severe that they required hospitalization [1]. Even though there are many types of injuries that contribute to injury mortality, three of the leading causes of death by injury in the USA are motor vehicle crashes, suicide, and homicide [1]. Mortality due to injuries is presented as age-adjusted rates.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2013

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amelie G. Ramirez
    • 1
  • Ian M. Thompson
    • 2
  • Leonel Vela
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Health Promotion ResearchUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.Department of UrologyUT Health Science Center at San Antonio Cancer Therapy and Research CenterSan AntonioUSA
  3. 3.Regional Academic Health CenterUT Health Science Center at San AntonioHarlingenUSA

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