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Inter caetero and outer space: some rules of engagement

  • James Muldoon
Part of the Studies in Space Policy book series (STUDSPACE, volume 1)

Abstract

On 19 January 2007 the issues with which this conference is concerned suddenly became front page news instead of the stuff of science fiction — when the world became aware that the Chinese government had employed one of its medium-range ballistic missiles to shoot down one of its own outdated weather satellites, presumably to demonstrate that government’s interest in the future of space travel. The actions of the Chinese government serve to remind us that while space is vast and there would seem to be room for any state interested in space exploration and exploitation, in fact such is not the case. Although the writers of fiction carry us imaginatively out into distant galaxies, traveling at speeds vastly faster than the speed of light, the realities of space travel keep us closer to earth, at least for the foreseeable future.

Keywords

Outer Space Legal Order Universal Jurisdiction Ballistic Missile Space Travel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Muldoon

There are no affiliations available

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