Aurignacian Male Crania, Jaws and Teeth from the Mladeč Caves, Moravia, Czech Republic

  • David W. Frayer
  • Jan Jelínek
  • Martin Oliva
  • Milford H. Wolpoff

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • David W. Frayer
  • Jan Jelínek
  • Martin Oliva
  • Milford H. Wolpoff

There are no affiliations available

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