No Evidence of Neandertal mtDNA Contribution to Early Modern Humans

  • David Serre
  • André Langaney
  • Mario Chech
  • Maria Teschler-Nicola
  • Maja Paunovic
  • Philippe Mennecier
  • Michael Hofreiter
  • Göran Possnert
  • Svante Pääbo

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Serre
  • André Langaney
  • Mario Chech
  • Maria Teschler-Nicola
  • Maja Paunovic
  • Philippe Mennecier
  • Michael Hofreiter
  • Göran Possnert
  • Svante Pääbo

There are no affiliations available

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