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Tumunu, the Bush Beer Bar Tradition of Atiu, Cook Islands

  • Richard DealEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter explores the tradition of tumunu on Atiu in the southern Cook Islands. Tumunu, which literally means “trunk of the coconut tree,” are drinking establishments hidden in the bush of the island where home brew is produced and drunk. This chapter will first briefly examine the role of kava in the Pacific and its replacement with alcohol. The growth in alcohol use led to the development of the tumunu, which arose to hide the production and consumption of alcohol because it was prohibited. The five tumunu that existed in 2014, as well as two recently closed ones, are mapped and compared. Next, the changes in the tumunu in the recent past are examined. Brewing ingredients have changed from mainly indigenous oranges to imported malt extract since the 1980s. The similarity of social practices relating to the tumunu and to the consumption of kava on other Pacific Islands is pronounced. These social practices are changing as the society changes, and from the presence of tourists at the tumunu, which are promoted as a tourist attraction on the island.

Keywords

Tumunu Bush beer Cook islands 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GeosciencesEdinboro UniversityEdinboroUSA

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