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Fire Protection of Steel Beams by Timber: Thermomechanical Analysis

  • Antoine BéreyziatEmail author
  • Maxime Audebert
  • Sébastien Durif
  • Abdelhamid Bouchaïr
  • Amir Si Larbi
  • Dhionis Dhima
Conference paper
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

This study evaluates the possibility to use timber members as a complete or partial fire protection for steel beams. The hybrid elements considered are composed by I or T-shaped steel profiles partially or fully encased into timber members. The thermal behavior is analyzed by using numerical simulation and the fire resistance is calculated by using an analytical method. The thermomechanical behavior of different configurations is compared considering standard fire conditions. This study shows how the wood protection leads to non-uniform thermal conditions into steel profiles for the considered hybrid beams. Therefore, it is proposed to divide steel sections into subsets for a better analysis. This method allows evaluating the mechanical resistance of steel elements during fire, considering a non-uniform temperature distribution. The results indicate that timber protection delays considerably the failure of steel components during fire. The comparison of various configurations shows how fire resistance is improved by using timber-steel beams instead of unprotected steel profiles.

Keywords

Timber-steel hybrid beams Fire protection Fire resistance 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by the Tremplin Carnot MECD, the French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME) and the Scientific and Technical Center for Building (CSTB).

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antoine Béreyziat
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Maxime Audebert
    • 1
  • Sébastien Durif
    • 3
  • Abdelhamid Bouchaïr
    • 3
  • Amir Si Larbi
    • 1
  • Dhionis Dhima
    • 4
  1. 1.University of Lyon, ENISESaint-EtienneFrance
  2. 2.French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME)AngersFrance
  3. 3.Université Clermont Auvergne, CNRS, SIGMA Clermont, Institut PascalClermont-FerrandFrance
  4. 4.Scientific and Technical Center for Building (CSTB)Champs-sur-MarneFrance

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