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Introduction

  • Wanying Wang
Chapter
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Part of the Curriculum Studies Worldwide book series (CSWW)

Abstract

Juxtaposing self-understanding with elements of ancient Chinese philosophical thought and hopefully informing a cosmopolitan concept of spirituality, I seek to articulate how I have engaged in my own subjective reconstruction. In this book I aspired to describe how my subjectivity has been reconstructed through autobiography and academic study. While writing autobiographically, an educational theory of my own has come to shape, which is called attunement. This educational theory, transcending school-subject-specific knowledge, lies in a subjective sense of intellectual labor and constitutes the self as both teacher and student. In this theory, all the institutional directives, cultural constraints, and sociopolitical influences become threaded through the subjective experience of the individual and are articulated autobiographically. These are allegorically articulated in myself—through these experiences. Curriculum theory is contextualized and concretized in myself.

Keywords

Currere Self-understanding Subjectivity Subjective reconstruction 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wanying Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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