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“A League That Shall Not End till Thames and Rhine Leave off to Run”: Dreams of an Anglo-German Protestant Empire

  • Kevin ChovanecEmail author
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Part of the Early Modern Literature in History book series (EMLH)

Abstract

The ceremony of the marriage between Elizabeth Stuart, James’s only daughter, and the German Elector Prince Frederick V took place on February 14, 1613. It was a lavish affair, the most extravagant of James’s reign and according to a recent monograph devoted to the marriage, “the pinnacle of Protestant European festival” (Smart and Wade, “The Palatine Wedding of 1613,” 21). In all, the masques, fireworks, and feigned sea-battles commissioned by the court to commemorate the union cost over 93,000 pounds, nearly bankrupting the monarchy. The celebrations lasted for five days in London and were extended for months on the couple’s parade through Protestant lands and back to Heidelberg.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Christian Brothers UniversityMemphisUSA

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