Advertisement

Henry, Prince of Wales, and Britain’s Lost Renaissance

  • Kevin ChovanecEmail author
Chapter
  • 8 Downloads
Part of the Early Modern Literature in History book series (EMLH)

Abstract

Cambridge University recently marked the 400th anniversary of the death of Henry Stuart, not without some irony (Henry associated himself with Oxford, and the fact that Cambridge had printed the first collection of elegies mourning the prince was felt as an ignoble sting by Oxonians), and their attempt to revive the prince hints at a central instability.

References

  1. Alexander, William. An Elegie on the Death of Prince Henrie. Edinburgh, 1613.Google Scholar
  2. Alexander, William. A Paraenesis to the Prince. London, 1604.Google Scholar
  3. Armitage, David. The Ideological Origins of the British Empire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.Google Scholar
  4. Badenhausen, Roy. “Disarming the Infant Warrior: Prince Henry, King James, and the Chivalric Revival.” Papers on Language and Literature: A Journal for Scholars and Critics of Language and Literature 31 (1995): 20–37.Google Scholar
  5. Baker, David. Between Nations: Shakespeare, Spenser, Marvell, and the Question of Britain. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997.Google Scholar
  6. Baker, David. “Britain Redux.” Spenser Studies 29 (2014): 21–36.Google Scholar
  7. Baker, David, and Willy Maley, eds. British Identities and English Renaissance Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.Google Scholar
  8. Bath, Michael. “‘Rare Shewes and Singular Inventions’: The Stirling Baptism of Prince Henry.” Journal of the Northern Renaissance 4 (2012). Accessed March 13, 2016. http://www.northernrenaissance.org/rare-shewes-and-singular-inventions-the-stirling-baptism-of-prince-henry/.
  9. Bath, Michael. Renaissance Decorative Painting in Scotland. Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland Publishing, 2003.Google Scholar
  10. Baudius, Dominicus. Monumentum consecratum Honori & memoriae Serenissimi Britanniarum Principis Henrici Frederici. Leiden, 1613.Google Scholar
  11. Bergeron, David M. “Creating Entertainments for Prince Henry’s Creation (1610).” Comparative Drama 42 (2009): 433–449.Google Scholar
  12. Bishop, Tom. “The Gingerbread Host: Tradition and Novelty in the Jacobean Masque.” In The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque, edited by David Bevington and Peter Holbrook, 88–120. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.Google Scholar
  13. Bowers, Rick. “James VI, Prince Henry, and A True Reportarie of the Baptism at Stirling.” Renaissance and Reformation 294 (2005): 3–22.Google Scholar
  14. Brady, Andrea. English Funerary Elegy in the Seventeenth Century: Laws in Mourning. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.Google Scholar
  15. Burgess, Glenn, ed. The New British History: Founding a Modern State, 1603–1725. London: I.B. Tauris, 1999.Google Scholar
  16. Buchtel, John A. “Book Dedications and the Death of a Patron: The Memorial Engraving in Chapman’s Homer.” Book History 7.1 (2004): 1–29.Google Scholar
  17. Butchel, John A. “‘To the Most High and Excellent Prince’: Dedicating Books to Henry, Prince of Wales.” In Prince Henry Revived, edited by Timothy Wilks, 104–133. London: Southampton Solent University Press, 2007.Google Scholar
  18. Butler, Martin. “Courtly Negotiations.” In The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque, edited by David Bevington and Peter Holbrook, 20–40. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.Google Scholar
  19. Cambridge University Library. “Mourning Prince Henry.” Accessed March 12, 2016. http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/exhibitions/princehenry/index.html.
  20. Chapman, George. An Epicede or Funerall Song on the Most Disastrous Death, of the High-borne Prince of Men, Henry Prince of Wales. London, 1613.Google Scholar
  21. Cornwallis, Sir William. “Elegie on the Untimely Death of the Incomparable Prince, Henry.” In Lachrymae Lachrymarum. London, 1613.Google Scholar
  22. Degenhardt, Jane. Islamic Conversion and Christian Resistance on the Early Modern Stage. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  23. Dickson, Gary. “Charisma, Medieval and Modern.” Religions (2012): 763–789.Google Scholar
  24. Donne, John. “Elegie Upon the Untimely Death of the Incomparable Prince Henry.” In The Complete English Poems, edited by A. J. Smith, 253–255. New York: Penguin, 1996.Google Scholar
  25. Drummond, William. Teares on the Death of Meliades. Edinburgh, 1613.Google Scholar
  26. Floyd-Wilson, Mary. English Ethnicity and Race in Early Modern Drama. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2003.Google Scholar
  27. Forman, Valerie. Tragicomic Redemptions: Global Economics and the Early Modern English Stage. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008.Google Scholar
  28. Fowler, William. A True Report of the Most Tryumphant, and Royall Accomplishment of the Baptisme. London, 1603.Google Scholar
  29. The French Herald. London, 1611.Google Scholar
  30. Fuchs, Barbara. Mimesis and Empire: The New World, Islam, and European Identities. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
  31. The Funerals of the High and Mighty Prince Henry. London, 1613.Google Scholar
  32. Goldberg, Jonathan. James I and the Politics of Literature: Jonson, Shakespeare, Donne and Their Contemporaries. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 1983.Google Scholar
  33. Griffin, Eric. English Renaissance Drama and the Specter of Spain. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009.Google Scholar
  34. Hadfield, Andrew. Shakespeare, Spenser, and the Matter of Britain. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.Google Scholar
  35. Haley, Peter. “Rudolf Sohm on Charisma.” Journal of Religion 60.2 (1980): 185–197.Google Scholar
  36. Hammill, Graham. “Blumenberg and Schmitt on the Rhetoric of Political Theology.” In Political Theology in Early Modernity, edited by Graham Hammill and Julia Reinhard Lupton, 84–101. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012.Google Scholar
  37. Harris, Tim. “In Search of a British History of Political Thought.” In British Political Thought in History, Literature, and Theory, 1500–1800, edited by David Armitage, 89–108. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.Google Scholar
  38. Hawkins, John [misattributed to Charles Cornwallis]. The Life and Death of Our Late Most Incomparable and Heroique Prince, Henry Prince of Wales. London, 1641.Google Scholar
  39. Holles, John. MSS Comm. Duke of Portland, IX. London, 1923.Google Scholar
  40. Jonson, Ben, The Speeches at Prince Henry’s Barriers. Cambridge: Chadwyck-Healey, 1994.Google Scholar
  41. Jonson, Ben. Works, Volume 10: Play Commentary; Masque Commentary, edited by C. H. Herford, Percy Simpson, and Evelyn Simpson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1950.Google Scholar
  42. Kay, Dennis. Melodious Tears: The English Funeral Elegy from Spenser to Milton. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990.Google Scholar
  43. Kerrigan, John. Archipelagic English: Literature, History, and Politics, 1603–1707. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.Google Scholar
  44. Kidd, Colin. British Identities Before Nationalism: Ethnicity and Nationhood in the Atlantic World 1600–1800. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
  45. Lewalski, Barbara. Protestant Poetics and the Seventeenth-Century Religious Lyric. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1979.Google Scholar
  46. Lockey, Brian. Law and Empire in English Renaissance Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.Google Scholar
  47. Lynch, Michael. “Court Ceremony and Ritual During the Personal Reign of James VI.” In The Reign of James VI, edited by Julian Goodare and Michael Lynch, 71–92. East Linton: Tuckwell, 2000.Google Scholar
  48. MacIntyre, Jean. “Prince Henry’s Satyrs: Topicality in Jonson’s Oberon.” In A Search for Meaning: Critical Essays on Early Modern Literature, edited by Paula Harms Payne, 95–104. New York: Peter Lang, 2004.Google Scholar
  49. MacLeod, Catharine, Rab MacGibbon, R. Smuts, and Timothy Wilks. The Lost Prince: The Life & Death of Henry Stuart. London: National Portrait Gallery, 2012.Google Scholar
  50. Maley, Willy. Nation, State, and Empire in English Renaissance Literature. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.Google Scholar
  51. Mann, A. J. “Hart, Andro (b. in or before 1566, d. 1621).” In Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press, 2004; online edition, January 2008. http://www.oxforddnb.com.libproxy.lib.unc.edu/view/article/12470. Accessed May 2, 2015.
  52. Marshall, Tristan. “Michael Drayton and the Writing of Jacobean Britain.” The Seventeenth Century 15.2 (2000): 127–148.Google Scholar
  53. Marshall, Tristan. Theatre and Empire: Great Britain on the London Stages Under James VI and I. New York: Manchester University Press, 2000.Google Scholar
  54. Mausoleum or, the Choisest Flowres of the Epitaphs, Written on the Death of the Never-too-much Lamented Prince Henrie. Edinburgh, 1613.Google Scholar
  55. McManus, Clare. “Marriage and the Performance of the Romance Quest: Anne of Denmark and the Stirling Baptismal Celebrations for Prince Henry.” In A Palace in the Wild: Essays of Vernacular Culture and Humanism in Late-Medieval and Renaissance Scotland, edited by L. R. J. R. Houwen, A. A. MacDonald, and S. L. Mapstone, 175–198. Leuven: Peeters, 2000.Google Scholar
  56. Melville, Andrew. Principis Scoti-Britannorum Natalia. Edinburgh, 1594.Google Scholar
  57. Morrill, John. “Thinking About the New British History.” In British Political Thought in History, Literature, and Theory, 1500–1800, edited by David Armitage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.Google Scholar
  58. Mulready, Cyrus. English Expansion Before and After Shakespeare. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.Google Scholar
  59. Niccol, Richard. The Three Sisters Teares Shed at the Late Solemne Funerals of the Royall Deceased Henry, Prince of Wales. London, 1613.Google Scholar
  60. Norbrook, David. “Levelling poetry: George Wither and the English revolution, 1642–1649.” English Literary Renaissance 21 (1991): 217–256.Google Scholar
  61. O’Callaghan, Michelle. The ‘Shepheard’s Nation’: Jacobean Spenserians and Early Stuart Political Culture, 1612–1625. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.Google Scholar
  62. Orgel, Stephen. The Jonsonian Masque. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1965.Google Scholar
  63. Pocock, John. “British History: A Plea for a New Subject.” The Journal of Modern History 47 (1975): 601–624.Google Scholar
  64. Pocock, John. “The New British History in Atlantic Perspective.” The American Historical Review 104 (1999): 490–500.Google Scholar
  65. Pollnitz, Aysha. “Humanism and the Education of Henry, Prince of Wales.” In Prince Henry Revived, edited Timothy Wilks, 22–64. London: Southampton Solent University Press, 2007.Google Scholar
  66. Price, Daniel. Lamentations for the Death of the Late Illustrious Prince Henry: And the Dissolution of His Religious Familie. London, 1612.Google Scholar
  67. Price, Daniel. Prince Henry His Second Anniversary. London, 1614.Google Scholar
  68. Pritchard, Allan. “George Wither: The Poet as Prophet.” Studies in Philology 59 (1962): 211–230.Google Scholar
  69. The Reformation of Religion by Iosiah. London, 1590.Google Scholar
  70. Reid, David. “Alexander, William, First Earl of Stirling (1577–1640), Poet and Politician.” In Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004; online edition, December 19, 2017. http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-335.
  71. Robinson, Benedict. Islam and Early Modern English Literature: The Politics of Romance from Spenser to Milton. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.Google Scholar
  72. Rust, Jennifer. The Body in Mystery: The Political Theology of the Corpus Mysticum in the Literature of Reformation England. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press.Google Scholar
  73. Schywzer, Philip. Literature, Nationalism, and Memory in Early Modern England and Wales. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.Google Scholar
  74. Smith, David. A History of the Modern British Isles, 1603–1707. Oxford: Blackwell, 1998.Google Scholar
  75. Smith, David Norman. “Faith Reason, and Charisma: Rudolf Sohm, Max Weber and the Theology of Grace.” Sociological Inquiry 68.1 (1998): 32–60.Google Scholar
  76. Soellner, Rolf. “Chapman’s Caesar and Pompey and the Fortunes of Prince Henry.” Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England 2 (1985): 135–151.Google Scholar
  77. Strong, Roy. Henry, Prince of Wales, and England’s Lost Renaissance. New York: Thames and Hudson, 1986.Google Scholar
  78. Sylvester, Josuah. “Lachrymae Lachrymarum: A Funeral Elegie.” In Lachrymae Lachryma or the Spirit of Teares. London, 1613.Google Scholar
  79. Taylor, Charles. Modern Social Imaginaries. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2003.Google Scholar
  80. Tourneur, Cyril. A Grief on the Death of Prince Henrie Expressed in a Broken Elegie. London, 1613.Google Scholar
  81. Ullyot, Michael. “James’s Reception and Henry’s Receptivity.” In Prince Henry Revived, edited by Timothy Wilks, 65–84. London: Southampton Solent University Press, 2007.Google Scholar
  82. Williams, Mary C. “Merlin and the Prince: The Speeches at Prince Henry’s Barriers.” Renaissance Drama 8 (1977): 221–230.Google Scholar
  83. Williamson, Arthur. “Patterns of British Identity.” In The New British History: Founding a Modern State, 1603–1725, edited by Glenn Burgess, 138–173. London: I B Tauris, 1999.Google Scholar
  84. Williamson, J. W. The Myth of the Conqueror: Prince Henry Stuart, a Study of 17th Century Personation. New York: AMS Press, 1978.Google Scholar
  85. Wilks, Timothy, ed. Prince Henry Revived: Image and Exemplarity in Early Modern England. London: Paul Holberton, 2007.Google Scholar
  86. Wither, George. Prince Henries Obsequies or Mournefull Elegies Upon His Death with a Supposed Inter-Locution Betweene the Ghost of Prince Henrie and Great Brittaine. London, 1612.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Christian Brothers UniversityMemphisUSA

Personalised recommendations