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A Transition to the Innovative Model of the Oil and Gas Industry Development as an Integral Part of Environmental Safety

  • E. A. Potapova
  • E. I. Bulatova
  • A. N. Kiryushkina
  • T. V. Polteva
Conference paper
  • 10 Downloads
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Business and Economics book series (SPBE)

Abstract

The entire world community is facing the issue of environmental safety. The rate of environmental pollution depends on the level of technology development. Therefore, innovative activities are the determining factors of the ecological state of the territories. In the Russian Federation, the activities related to the mining of mineral resources, based on the oil and gas industry, are particularly damaging to the environment. This work suggests a methodical approach to the assessment of the influence of various factors on the amount of production and consumption waste in the sphere of mining. The basis of the simulation in the study is the correlation-regression analysis. The conclusion is made that there are insufficient state support and the need to finance technological innovations in the oil and gas industry by the companies themselves. However, in the modern economy, the innovation activity of enterprises is limited. Most of the implemented innovative projects are aimed primarily at reducing costs. At the same time, the aspect of improving environmental safety is neglected. The work defines other mechanisms for financing such innovations and identifies factors that affect their level.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Potapova
    • 2
  • E. I. Bulatova
    • 1
  • A. N. Kiryushkina
    • 2
  • T. V. Polteva
    • 2
  1. 1.Kazan Federal UniversutyKazanRussia
  2. 2.Togliatti State UniversityTogliattiRussia

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