Advertisement

The Basic Functions of Music

  • Guerino Mazzola
  • Jason Noer
  • Yan Pang
  • Shuhui Yao
  • Jay Afrisando
  • Christopher Rochester
  • William Neace
Chapter
  • 26 Downloads

Abstract

In this chapter we will focus on the basic functions of music and divide its focus into two distinguished approaches, theoretical and empirical. In the theoretical approach we will deduce the basic function of music based on theoretical frameworks based on evolutionary and non-evolutionary approaches. Within the empirical functions we will discuss the role of music in daily life, as well as discover potential fundamental dimensions implied by the multiple functions of music. Then we discuss how music acts on the human brain like a drug through the hippocampal gate function.

References

  1. 10.
    J.J. Arnett, Adolescents’ uses of media for self-socialisation. J. Youth Adolesc. 24, 519–533 (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 13.
    D. Boer, Music Makes the People Come Together: Social Functions of Music Listening for Young People Across Cultures (Department of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, 2009). http://researcharchive.vuw.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10063/1155/thesis.pdf?sequence=1 Google Scholar
  3. 18.
    E. Bullough, Recent work in experimental aesthetics. Br. J. Psychol. 12, 76–99 (1921)Google Scholar
  4. 22.
    T. Chamorro-Premuzic, A. Furnham, Personality and music: can traits explain how people use music in everyday life. Br. J. Psychol. 98, 175–85 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1348/000712606X111177 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 31.
    D. Falk, Prelinguistic evolution in early hominins: whence motherese. Behav. Brain Sci. 27, 491–503 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X04000111 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 32.
    D. Falk, The “putting the baby down” hypothesis: bipedalism, babbling, and baby siblings. Behav. Brain Sci. 27, 526–534 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X0448011X CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 45.
    T. Hays, V. Minichiello, The meaning of music in the lives of older people: a qualitative study. Psychol. Music 33, 437–51 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1177/0305735605056160 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 103.
    A.J. Lonsdale, A.C. North, Why do we listen to music: a uses and gratifications analysis. Br. J. Psychol. 102, 108–34 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1348/000712610X506831 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 104.
    P.D. MacLean, The triune brain, emotion, and scientific bias, in The Neurosciences: Second Study Program, ed. by F.O. Schmitt (Rockefeller University Press, New York, 1970), pp. 336–48Google Scholar
  10. 124.
    G. Miller, Evolution of human music through sexual selection, in The Origins of Music, ed. by N.L. Wallin, B. Merker, S. Brown (The MIT Press, Cambridge 2015), pp. 329–360Google Scholar
  11. 136.
    J. Panksepp, G. Bernatzky, Emotional sounds and the brain: the neuro-affective foundations of musical appreciation. Behav. Process. 60, 133–55 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1016/S0376-635700080-3 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 143.
    T. Schäfer, P. Sedlmeier, C. Städtler, D. Huron, The psychological functions of music listening. Front. Psychol. 4, 511 (2013)Google Scholar
  13. 151.
    L.R. Squire, N. Butters, Neuropsychology of Memory (Guildford, New York, 1984)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 158.
    J. Winson, Brain and Psyche. The Biology of the Unconscious (Anchor Press/Doubleday, Garden City, 1985)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guerino Mazzola
    • 1
  • Jason Noer
    • 2
  • Yan Pang
    • 2
  • Shuhui Yao
    • 1
  • Jay Afrisando
    • 1
  • Christopher Rochester
    • 1
  • William Neace
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MinnesotaSchool of MusicMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Theatre Arts & DanceUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

Personalised recommendations