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Effect of Constant Contact Side Bearing Design on Dynamic Performances of Wagon with Two Conventional Three-Piece Bogies

  • Yanquan SunEmail author
  • Maksym Spiryagin
  • Colin Cole
Conference paper
  • 7 Downloads
Part of the Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering book series (LNME)

Abstract

Dynamic performance - hunting stability and dynamic curving of a freight container wagon with two conventional three-piece bogies has been compared with the same wagon with improved bogies through the simulations. A typical wagon popularly used in Australia is modelled for simulations using the Gensys software. The improvement on the conventional three-piece bogie is only focused on side bearings, which are replaced with the long-travel constant contact side bearings. The simulation results show that the improved bogies significantly increase the wagon dynamic hunting stability performance.

Keywords

Wagon hunting Wagon curving Long-travel constant contact side bearings 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Railway EngineeringCentral Queensland UniversityRockhamptonAustralia

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