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Inquiry

  • Roberto Gronda
Chapter
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Part of the Synthese Library book series (SYLI, volume 421)

Abstract

This chapter is dedicated to the analysis of the temporal pattern of inquiry. This chapter is mainly metaphilosophical: its thesis is that the import of Dewey’s idea of inquiry should be ‘cashed out’ at a metaphilosophical level, in terms of the language that we should use to describe the structure of scientific activities. I argue that Dewey’s naturalism, together with his emphasis on the metaphilosophical primacy of the category of activity, puts a number of relevant constraints on what counts as a good philosophical explanation of the different phases that make up scientific inquiries. I offer a detailed reconstruction of Dewey’s concepts of situation and tertiary quality, as well as a new account of his notion of warranted assertibility.

Keywords

Biological basis of inquiry Foreshadowing Serial nature of behavior Phases of inquiry Rejection of epistemology Situation Normativity Tertiary quality Warranted assertibility Truth Fallibilism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto Gronda
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Civiltà e Forme del SapereUniversità di PisaPisaItaly

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