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Crop-Livestock Inter-linkages and Climate Change Implications for Ethiopia’s Agriculture: A Ricardian Approach

  • Zenebe GebreegziabherEmail author
  • Alemu Mekonnen
  • Rahel Deribe Bekele
  • Samuel Abera Zewdie
  • Meseret Molla Kassahun
Chapter
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Part of the Climate Change Management book series (CCM)

Abstract

There have been few attempts to look into the economic impacts of climate change in the context of Ethiopia. Although mixed crop-livestock farming is a dominant farming style, most of the studies on climate change, at least in the context of Ethiopia, have emphasized only crop agriculture and disregarded the role of livestock. In this research, we analyze climate change and agricultural productivity in Ethiopia in its broader sense, inclusive of livestock production. We employ a Ricardian approach, estimating three modified versions of the Ricardian model. Results show that warmer temperature is beneficial to livestock agriculture, while it is harmful to the Ethiopian economy from the crop agriculture point of view. Moreover, increasing/decreasing rainfall associated with climate change is damaging to both agricultural activities.

Keywords

Crop-livestock inter-linkages Agriculture Climate change Ricardian model Ethiopia 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support for this work from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) through the Environment for Development Initiative (EfD), Department of Economics, University of Gothenburg.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zenebe Gebreegziabher
    • 1
    Email author
  • Alemu Mekonnen
    • 2
  • Rahel Deribe Bekele
    • 3
  • Samuel Abera Zewdie
    • 4
  • Meseret Molla Kassahun
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversity of MekelleMekelleEthiopia
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsAddis Ababa UniversityAddis AbabaEthiopia
  3. 3.Center for Development Research, University of BonnBonnGermany
  4. 4.Environment and Climate Research Center, Policy Studies InstituteAddis AbabaEthiopia
  5. 5.Private ConsultantAddis AbabaEthiopia

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