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Trans-Asian Spectropoetics: Conjuring War and Violence on the Haunted Stage of History

  • Rossella FerrariEmail author
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Part of the Transnational Theatre Histories book series (TTH)

Abstract

The chapter examines two adaptations of Singaporean playwright Kuo Pao Kun’s The Spirits Play (1998) in the context of Asia’s conflicted politics of memory. The Spirits Play: Rituals to Soothe the Unsettled Spirits (2011/12)—a theatre and kunqu (Kun opera) crossover co-directed by Satō Makoto (Tokyo) and Danny Yung (Hong Kong)—memorializes the Nanjing Massacre of 1937 and the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, while Hung Chit-wah (Hong Kong) and Hung Pei-ching (Taipei)’s The Mother Hen Next Door (2010) and The Mother Hen Next Door: A Tribute (2012) cross-reference Tiananmen Square with Taiwan’s February 28 Incident of 1947. The chapter argues that the invocation of the dramaturgical device of the ghost interweaves a spectropoetics of violence with a spectropolitics of redemption and quest for justice.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SOAS, University of LondonLondonUK

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