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The Story of Migraine Surgery: 20 Years in the Making

  • Bahman Guyuron
Chapter
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Abstract

It began with mere kismet and became a field with gratifying outcomes. Over 40 studies later published in respected peer-reviewed journals from our center alone and supported by many independent studies conducted by reputable surgeons from recognized centers over the last 20 years, there is now strong evidence that surgical treatment of headaches and migraines is safe and effective. The scientific course commenced with a retrospective study and continued with a prospective pilot study, a prospective randomized study, a 5-year follow-up study, and a prospective randomized study with sham surgery. During that time, we identified seven trigger sites from which migraine headaches could arise and developed ways of deactivating all of these sites. In the last 10 years, we have focused on improving results, extending care to adolescent patients with migraine headaches, researching the ultrastructural characteristics of peripheral nerves in headache patients, and investigating the socioeconomic benefits of migraine surgery as well as the specific factors contributing to the success and failure of these operations. The details of our progress are discussed in this chapter.

Keywords

History Migraine surgery Safety Efficacy Evidence Trigger sites Elimination Improvement 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bahman Guyuron
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plastic SurgeryCase Western Reserve School of MedicineClevelandUSA

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