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Software Startup Education: A Transition from Theory to Practice

  • Rafael ChaninEmail author
  • Afonso Sales
  • Rafael Prikladnicki
Chapter
  • 83 Downloads

Abstract

New software startups are born every day around the globe. Dropbox and Netflix are examples of successful startups. However, failure is the fate of most of them. Several facts, such as market competition or lack of resources, can impact the destiny of a startup. Nonetheless, little has been explored in terms of the impact of software startup education on the success or failure of startups. Even though universities are adapting their curriculum in order to embrace such important subject, the challenge relies on how to provide real-world experiences for students to develop relevant startups. Hence, this chapter intends to present the main contributions, initiatives, and lessons learned found in the literature regarding software startup education.

Keywords

Software startup education Software startup Entrepreneurship 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This work is partially funded by FAPERGS (17/2551-0001/205-4) and CNPq.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of TechnologyPUCRSPorto AlegreBrazil

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