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Psychiatric Emergencies: Self-Harm, Suicidal, Homicidal Behavior, Addiction, and Substance use

  • Simona BujoreanuEmail author
  • Sara Golden Pell
  • Monique Ribeiro
Chapter
  • 23 Downloads
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

This chapter will address cross-cutting issues relevant to the work of psychologists in medical settings. One The focus will be on diagnostic assessment and differentials for psychiatric emergencies and on using a biopsychosocial formulation as well as cultural and developmental perspectives as the foundation for the management of acute safety concerns (e.g., agitation, homicidal/violent behaviors) and other psychiatric emergencies (e.g., suicidality, self-harm, substance abuse, and addictions). The chapter also addresses intervention strategies that psychologists can employ in managing psychiatric emergencies in medical settings (both inpatient units and outpatient specialty and primary care clinics), tips for engaging youth in crisis and their families, strategies for behavioral and environmental interventions, as well as tools to further assess and inform care. The final focus of the chapter is on multidisciplinary collaboration within the medical setting and on the available resources in the medical setting and in the community that psychologists can access when creating treatment recommendations.

Keywords

Psychiatric emergencies Consultation-liaison Medical setting Agitation Suicidality Aggression Homicidal ideation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simona Bujoreanu
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Sara Golden Pell
    • 1
    • 2
  • Monique Ribeiro
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Boston Children’s HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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