Advertisement

Mary Blachford Tighe: ‘No Haunting Dream’

  • Anthony John HardingEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The poetry of Mary Tighe (1772–1810) has undergone a more dramatic fall into obscurity than that of any other woman poet of the Romantic period. Shortly after her death, Blackwood’s Magazine ranked her alongside Joanna Baillie and Felicia Hemans: ‘Scotland has her Baillie—Ireland her Tighe—and England her Hemans’. Today, only Psyche: or the Legend of Love, is widely known as Keats borrowed from it in writing ‘The Eve of St Agnes’ and ‘Ode to Psyche’. Chronology, geography, and gender determined both the rise and subsequent fall of Tighe’s literary reputation. Her untimely death meant that the first widely circulated edition of her poems was overseen by her mother and brother-in-law, who wished to represent her character as that of a devout, cultured lady. Mary Tighe can now be recognised as a poet with a wide range, including the political and satirical as well as the descriptive and meditative; her work illustrates Jo Gill’s view that poetry by women frequently rejects such binaries as ‘public’ versus ‘private’, and ‘political’ versus ‘personal’.

Works Cited

  1. Butler, Judith. 1999. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  2. Diamond, Lisa M. 2008. Sexual Fluidity: Understanding Women’s Love and Desire. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Feldman, Paula R., and Brian C. Cooney. 2016. Introduction. In: The Collected Poetry of Mary Tighe. Eds. Paula R. Feldman and Brian C. Cooney, 1–55. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Fine, Cordelia. 2011. Delusions of Gender: How Our Minds, Society, and Neurosexism Create Difference. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  5. Gill, Jo. 2007. Women’s Poetry. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Gilligan, Carol. 1993. In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women’s Development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Linkin, Harriet Kramer. 2002. Skirting Around the Sex in Mary Tighe’s ‘Psyche’. Studies in English Literature, 42: 732–52.Google Scholar
  8. ———. 2005. Introduction: Mary Blachford Tighe. In: The Collected Poems and Journals of Mary Tighe, xv–xxxiii. Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky.Google Scholar
  9. ———. 2017. Locating Irish Romanticism in Mary Tighe’s Poetry and Prose. European Romantic Review, 28: 431–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Roe, Nicholas. 2012. John Keats: A New Life. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Tighe, Mary Blachford. 2005. The Collected Poems and Journals. Ed. Harriet Kramer Linkin. Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky.Google Scholar
  12. ———. 2016. The Collected Poetry. Eds. Paula R. Feldman and Brian C. Cooney. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Weller, Earle Vonard. 1928. Keats and Mary Tighe: The Poems of Mary Tighe, with Parallel Passages from the Work of John Keats. New York: MLA.Google Scholar
  14. Wollstonecraft, Mary. 1975. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. Ed. Carol H. Poston. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  15. Wordsworth, William. 1977. The Prelude, 1798–1799. Ed. Stephen Parrish. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

Personalised recommendations