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Probing the Realms of Lostness, Non-Canonicity and Oblivion: An Introduction

  • Norbert LennartzEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The representation of British Romanticism as a loose assortment of six, famous white men has by now been relegated to the lore of academic legend, to the region of myths that some of the Romantics seem to have been so eager to inhabit.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of VechtaVechtaGermany

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