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Learner’s Creative Thinking Learning with Constructivist Web-Based Learning Environment Model: Integration Between Pedagogy and Neuroscience

  • Sumalee ChaijaroenEmail author
  • Issara Kanjug
  • Charuni Samat
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11937)

Abstract

The Purposes of this research were: (1) to examine learners’ creative thinking (2) to compare pretest and posttest of the learners’ creative thinking for measuring and evaluation of executive function by using Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT). The Model research Phase III Model Use was employed in this study. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed. Mean, standard deviation, percentage and Z test, Wilcoxon Matched-pairs Signed rank test and protocol analysis were used to analyzed the data. The target group was 27 learners of the 2018 academic year at Banhaedsuksa School. The results showed that: (1) The students’ creative thinking 4 aspects including: (1) fluency (2) flexibility (3) originality and (4) elaboration and (2) The comparison of the pretest and posttest of the learners’ creative thinking, from measuring and evaluation of executive function by using Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking showed that standard scores total activity of posttest all students were significantly higher than standard scores total activity of pretest at the level 0.05

Keywords

Constructivist Web-based learning environment Neuroscience Creative thinking 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was granted from the National Research Council and supported by Research Group for Innovation and Cognitive Technology, Khon Kaen University.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sumalee Chaijaroen
    • 1
    Email author
  • Issara Kanjug
    • 1
  • Charuni Samat
    • 2
  1. 1.Educational Technology, Faculty of EducationKhon Kaen UniversityKhon KaenThailand
  2. 2.Computer Education, Faculty of EducationKhon Kaen UniversityKhon KaenThailand

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