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Enterprising Universities and Industrial Ecosystems

  • Robert James CrammondEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

A critical aspect towards student, graduate entrepreneur, and university success, concerning entrepreneurship education, Crammond discusses the importance of the development of entrepreneurial universities and their links with industry. In this chapter, the benefits of these industrial links, nationally and internationally, are detailed. Additionally, the concept of the entrepreneurial ecosystem, desired by many, is also visited. Small businesses, multinationals, and governments all provide necessary support and expertise, in enriching universities. This chapter focuses on how these relationships, through practice and publication, have aided in the formulation and development of creative, innovative, and ultimately, enterprising higher education institutions. As Crammond asserts, through examples and a novel, conceptual illustration, this development strengthens entrepreneurial networks, encourages entrepreneurial mind-sets and behaviours, and promotes entrepreneurial activity.

Keywords

Entrepreneurial ecosystems Enterprise Entrepreneurial University Small business Industry 

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© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Business and EnterpriseUniversity of the West of ScotlandSouth LanarkshireUK

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