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Blending Traditional and Modern Approaches to Teaching Control Theory

  • Inna A. Seledtsova
  • Leonid ChechurinEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems book series (LNNS, volume 95)

Abstract

Control Theory serves as a fundamental background for a number of popular paradigms, including the cyber-physical one. The contents have been standardized over the decades of teaching, but new digital technologies and market practical skills demand to raise the questions on how the course is to be taught. The goal of the report is to share the results of 3 years (2015–2018) of experimenting on the transition from classical to project-based blended design of the Modern Control and Automation course. The course is part of the curricula of the SPbPU MSc degree programme “Management of Innovative Processes (Innovatika)”; 75 students were taught. Now, the course is represented by online and offline studying of the basic theoretical aspects and hands-on development of a hardware device in a project group. Each element of the course, its three-year evolution, analysis of the collected data, results of surveys and recommendations for adaptation of the used tools for teaching control theory in the frames of another educational program or university are described in the article.

Keywords

Control theory Blended learning Project-based learning 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This report was partially supported by CEPHEI project of the ERASMUS+ EU framework.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Peter the Great Saint Petersburg Polytechnic UniversitySaint PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.LUT UniversityLappeenrantaFinland

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