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Treatment-Resistant Depression: Deep Brain Stimulation

  • Patricio Riva-PosseEmail author
  • A. Umair Janjua
Chapter
  • 105 Downloads

Abstract

Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is an ongoing area of concern in public health, with increasing interest in the psychiatric scientific community, carrying great personal and societal costs. Patients are left with few options after failing psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches, other than neuromodulation (electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation) and novel treatments such as ketamine. These patients undergo more medication trials and hospitalizations, have higher rates of disability, and have higher rates of suicide. The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for this disorder has the potential of providing a new treatment to address this serious condition once less invasive strategies failed. A number of different targets involving modulation of mood neurocircuitry have been investigated in the last 15 years. This chapter will review the history and current evidence of DBS at various targets for the treatment of affective disorders and provide insights into the field.

Keywords

Deep brain stimulation Major depressive disorder Treatment-resistant depression Ventral striatum Subcallosal cingulate Nucleus accumbens Medial forebrain bundle Lateral habenula 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesEmory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA

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