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Social Justice in the Language Curriculum: Interrogating the Goals and Outcomes of Language Education in College

  • Magda Tarnawska SenelEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter suggests ways of rethinking the language curriculum at the collegiate level in ways that are more inclusive and expansive than outlined in the World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages and connecting it to the sociopolitical realities facing us today. Such curriculum is based on a more nuanced understanding of the 5 Cs and adds new dimensions to the existing model: (1) criticality and civil courage to communication, (2) complexity to cultures, (3) context to comparisons, (4) connectedness to connections, and (5) concern, care, and compassion to communities. Tarnawska Senel argues that language instruction must include social justice initiatives related to both broader global contexts and specifically local issues and advocates engaging in a deliberately political teaching that is informed by cultural studies and critical pedagogy.

Keywords

Social justice education Critical pedagogy Language curriculum Language education Cultural studies 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of California Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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