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Impact Analysis of Soil and Water Conservation Structures- Jalyukt Shivar Abhiyan- A Case Study

  • Ajay Kolekar
  • Anand B. TapaseEmail author
  • Y. M. Ghugal
  • B. A. Konnur
Conference paper
Part of the Sustainable Civil Infrastructures book series (SUCI)

Abstract

In the state of Maharashtra, civilians from 188 talukas were facing the drought-like situations till 2014–15. The groundwater level was lowered by 2–3 m due to inadequate and uncertain rainfall. To overcome the situation, the state government started to water and soil conservation works under Jalyukt Shivar Abhiyan scheme. In rural areas, various works like chain cement Nala bandh, desilting the reservoirs, repairs to K. T. weir bandhara, deep continuous contour trenches, compartmental bunding were carried out. As per the information received from the Water Conservation Department, more than 8000 crores spent in the last 4 years on this project. The expenditure is made village wise wherein from the data obtained it is noted that in around 15460 villages have received fund and 100% works were found complete, 80% works in 821 villages were found complete, 50% of works were found complete in 410 villages, 30% of works were found complete in 2,922 villages but still 2395 have still to start the work. The paper focuses on correlating the funds spend and the impact of various soil and water conservation works. Sample villages were assessed by conducting a survey at ground level. It is observed that in the number of villages the groundwater table was raised resulting in charging the wells from the nearby area. Conventional crop pattern was found improved with increased yield.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ajay Kolekar
    • 1
  • Anand B. Tapase
    • 2
    Email author
  • Y. M. Ghugal
    • 3
  • B. A. Konnur
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringGovernment College of Engineering, KaradKaradIndia
  2. 2.Department of Civil EngineeringRayat Shikshan Sanstha’s, Karmaveer Bhaurao Patil College of EngineeringSataraIndia
  3. 3.Department of Applied MechanicsGovernment College of Engineering, KaradKaradIndia

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