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A Policy Perspective on Shrinkage

  • Josefina Syssner
Chapter
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Part of the SpringerBriefs in Geography book series (BRIEFSGEOGRAPHY)

Abstract

Research devoted to explain why some places grow while others shrink tend to suggest that demographic decline is the result of structural conditions and changes that to a large extent are out of control for the local governments in the shrinking areas. This chapter suggests that this indicates a need for policies for how to address the local consequences of depopulation. In this chapter, the author accounts for the policy concept and suggests that policies consist of ideas – in terms of norms and values, but also in terms of cognitive paradigms and analytical frameworks. Altogether, the author seeks to contribute to the field of shrinkage-related studies by building upon a theoretical and empirical interest in public policy.

Keywords

Policy Policy analysis Policy theory Stipulations Norms Prescriptions Depopulation Shrinkage 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Josefina Syssner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Culture and SocietyLinköping UniversityNorrkopingSweden

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