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Facilitating Information Exploration of Archival Library Materials Through Multi-modal Storytelling

  • Zev BattadEmail author
  • Andrew White
  • Mei Si
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11869)

Abstract

This project aims to help people explore, understand, and rediscover the many-to-many relationships of content within library archives using multi-modal storytelling. This project builds upon an existing multi-modal storytelling system which is designed to help people explore large knowledge graphs by actively constructing narratives using information from the knowledge graphs. We present this system and a case study of how the process of creating the knowledge graph from existing archives becomes an iterative hypothesis testing process and triggers new knowledge discovery.

Keywords

Library achieves Knowledge graph Multi-modal presentation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Rensselaer Polytechnic InstituteTroyUSA

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