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Towards an Educational Model for Lifelong Learning

  • Jordi ConesaEmail author
  • Josep-Maria Batalla-Busquets
  • David Bañeres
  • Carme Carrion
  • Israel Conejero-Arto
  • María del Carmen Cruz Gil
  • Montserrat Garcia-Alsina
  • Beni Gómez-Zúñiga
  • María J. Martinez-Argüelles
  • Xavier Mas
  • Tona Monjo
  • Enric Mor
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems book series (LNNS, volume 96)

Abstract

Today, lifelong learning is fully integrated into our society. From the student point of view, lifelong learning has several characteristics that differentiate it from regular learning: domains of interest may be very broad; learning occurs in different depths; topics to study may be related both to work, family and leisure; students’ continuity cannot be guaranteed since their availability can be intermittent and little constant; a great dynamism is required in order to allow studying any topic, in any order, in the moment that best suit each student and at the best pace for everyone. Over 25 years ago some authors already claimed for moving towards innovative learning models, more personalized and where the students would take a more active role and would decide what to learn, when to learn and how to learn. Technology was not ready then to support this change of pedagogical paradigm, but it seems to be ready now. Thus, the technological context is set for facilitating a change of paradigm to promote lifelong learning. However, lifelong learners continue suffering from a model not adapted to their needs and preferences. This position paper discusses on the actual situation of lifelong learning from a critical point of view, analyzing some of the relevant literature and justifying the need to create new models that promote self-determination of students in the context of lifelong learning.

Keywords

Lifelong learning Lifewide learning Andragogy Heutagogy eLearning 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work has been partially supported by the eLearn Center through the project Xtrem 2018 and by European Commission through the project “colMOOC: Integrating Conversational Agents and Learning Analytics in MOOCs” (588438-EPP-1-2017-1-EL-EPPKA2-KA). This research has also been supported by the SmartLearn Research Group at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jordi Conesa
    • 1
    Email author
  • Josep-Maria Batalla-Busquets
    • 1
  • David Bañeres
    • 1
  • Carme Carrion
    • 1
  • Israel Conejero-Arto
    • 1
  • María del Carmen Cruz Gil
    • 2
  • Montserrat Garcia-Alsina
    • 1
  • Beni Gómez-Zúñiga
    • 1
  • María J. Martinez-Argüelles
    • 1
  • Xavier Mas
    • 1
  • Tona Monjo
    • 1
  • Enric Mor
    • 1
  1. 1.Universitat Oberta de CatalunyaBarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Universidad Carlos III de MadridMadridSpain

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