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X-Men at Auschwitz? Superheroes, Nazis, and the Holocaust

  • Edward B. Westermann
Chapter
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Abstract

The Holocaust continues to exert a dominant presence within US popular culture, and the events involving the destruction of the European Jews increasingly have found representation in comic books and graphic novels. The inherently allegorical nature of these works, which often focus on questions of good versus evil, makes the Holocaust a natural topic for examination. The medium, with its telegraphic phrasing, sequential paneling, and artwork, creates new interpretive spaces for merging historical narrative with artistic expression. This chapter demonstrates that comics have the ability to reach a much broader and diverse population than most historical or literary texts, and they provide a forum, even if imperfect, for representing the horrors of Nazism to a readership who might otherwise never explore these events.

Notes

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank my colleague, Dr. Jackson Ayres, and the editors for their insightful and substantive contributions in the review of this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward B. Westermann
    • 1
  1. 1.Texas A&M University-San AntonioSan AntonioUSA

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