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Confucian Ethics: Human Relatedness, Benevolence, and Reciprocity

  • Mary Mee-Yin Yuen
Chapter
Part of the Religion and Global Migrations book series (RGM)

Abstract

In this chapter, Yuen examines the virtue account of the Chinese Confucian tradition and put it into dialogue with the Catholic tradition, in order to enrich the Catholic tradition. She highlights the virtue features of Confucian ethics in the writings of Confucius, focusing on the notion of moral self-cultivation. Relevant to moral self-cultivation are the concept of self and human relatedness, the virtue of ren or humaneness, the moral ideal and exemplars, and the notion of harmony. These features of Confucian ethics are imperative in forming the attitude and character of benevolence in the receiving countries toward the migrants.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Mee-Yin Yuen
    • 1
  1. 1.Holy Spirit Seminary College of Theology and PhilosophyHong KongHong Kong

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