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Human Well-Being Policy and Discussion

  • Vijay Kumar ShrotryiaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Human Well-Being Research and Policy Making book series (HWBRPM)

Abstract

The world has evolved in speed and space, in wealth and health, in knowledge and wisdom, and the process is continuous. These changes have expanded the horizon of our thinking and raised our expectations of society, government, and our fellow man. South Asia is no exception to this trend. There are more visible democracies, there are larger and taller buildings than ever, the average lifespan has increased, there are more schools and hospitals, people are more connected in this digital age, and more people are living above the poverty line. These changes impart a general feeling that the present is a better and happier time to live than any other time in history. This mindset is what has to be studied in order to determine whether the visible progress has truly been translated into better human well-being or not. This chapter examines the input (Chap.  3) and outcome (Chap.  2) concerning given indicators and the narrative they create. This chapter gives a detailed discussion on economic progress and policy; health and education; and politics and governance. Changes as they have occurred are narrated through published reports and research which help the reader to understand the region, indicators, and the larger story of South Asia.

Keywords

Human well-being South Asia Public policy GDP Health Education Governance Poverty 

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of CommerceUniversity of DelhiDelhiIndia

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