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Introduction: The International Organization for Migration as the New ‘UN Migration Agency’

  • Antoine PécoudEmail author
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Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the edited volume entitled The International Organization for Migration: The New ‘UN Migration Agency’ in Critical Perspective. It outlines the key findings of each chapter and identifies the core cross-cutting arguments that emerge from the chapters of this book. After providing a short history of the International Organization for Migration (IOM) until its transformation into a United Nations (UN) agency in 2016, the chapter summarises the key issues raised by research on the IOM along four key topics: state sovereignty, the global economy, humanitarian protection/human rights, and knowledge production.

Keywords

International Organization for Migration United Nations Global migration governance Migration management 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Sorbonne Paris NordParisFrance

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